Fun with Reamers....

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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Bob Salter on Thu Feb 03, 2011 2:26 pm

Ok I have a set of Rowesome reamers made and am quite happy with the results. I am now in the as accurate as possible school of reamer making as the results speak for themselves(especially in the second octave.) Measuring insertion depths as you ream is also instructive. I'm going to start a set for a Taylor bore tomorrow, just to hear what the difference in sound is. I wont be trying to make those ribbon keys though, just a "normal" chanter but with a taylor bore. At first I found making reamers frustrating and boring but now I am starting to enjoy it. Wish I had a milling machine though.... Sad

Bob
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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Jwalker on Thu Feb 03, 2011 6:08 pm

Awesome, i hope you have this thread on email notification, I just got a metal lathe and am going to start making reamers!

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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  texasbagpiper on Thu Feb 03, 2011 6:26 pm

Bob Salter wrote:Good grief, Ive just spent six mind numbing and utterly stressful hours making stepped reamer blanks. The main bore reamer had 25 points to measure, all done with a micrometer each point measured several times. No measurements are out by more than .02mm. My eyes will be permanently crossed. Shocked Still, with the throat and main bore reamers made I just need to smooth and grind, which is slow but stress free. By next weekend I should be able to give them a tryout in some plastic. I'll also need to make a bell reamer but that shouldn't take too long. In case you wondered, I decided on three reamers as each one is two thirds less stress that a single large one. Three will also allow a little more control over the throat positions and so on. This reamer is for the Timothy Kenna C set from SRS journals. You can just make out the small steps if you look carefully

Bob

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I have all my reamers custom made, but I'm thinking about trying to make one in this manor. How do you get a cutting edge on a blank like this. Seth
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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Bob Salter on Thu Feb 03, 2011 10:41 pm

At the grinder. You grind away just slightly less than 50%. I'll post a picture when I get in from work tonight.

Bob


Last edited by Bob Salter on Sat Feb 05, 2011 3:46 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Bob Salter on Sat Feb 05, 2011 3:44 pm

You can quite clearly see how half of the cone has been ground away. Its very slow and you need to keep measuring cause if you go below half its ruined. David quinns cd has a great article on this method



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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  texasbagpiper on Sat Feb 05, 2011 7:23 pm

I wish I had the patience for this type of reamer. I guess if I needed more than a few reamers then I would make them myself. I have 4 reamers that I use. One for D Uilleann reamers, One for flat C, Bb, and B Uilleann chanters, tenor and baritone regulators, One for Highland chanters, and One for Borderpipes. I do have some flat tool steel reamers that start the bores for the spiral reamers so they will last longer and keep their edge. Seth
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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Art on Sun Feb 06, 2011 2:20 pm

Thanks, Bob. Do you have a photo or diagram of the cross section? I'm curious about whether there's any curve to the inner edge.

Does it have to be 1/2? or would a 1/3 ground away (with 2/3 still there) also work. Hmm. I suppose that'd be like the ones with multiple flutes.
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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Bob Salter on Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:28 am

The "flat" face is slightly hollow from the curve of the grindstone. I dont think one third off would give enough rake to cut successfully but I guess you could try it.

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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Jwalker on Mon Feb 07, 2011 6:20 pm

Or I guess you could take a 1/4 off each side..... Oh wait were back to a flat reamer again!
Another possibility, mill out a quarter section, think of the unibits you can buy at the hardware store. Of course the fluted reamers are nice cause it seems like they give support on all sides to keep the shape of the bore. Had a little time to mess around with the lathe, working on the tapering technique. I am setting the cross slide bevel to do this, any advice Bob?

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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Bob Salter on Tue Feb 08, 2011 12:34 pm

I use the method detailed by Bill Haneman in the link above. If you mean that you are setting over the cross slide at an angle then its more trouble than its worth. Setting it over accurately is a nightmare for a start. The cross slide has very limited travel so you would be constantly winding everything back and forward. In the case of an uileann reamer the taper isnt constant so having finally set the right angle for one part you would have to move it for the next. I think I would be running for the prozac by that point Very Happy If you do want a straight taper I would still use Bills' method. First draw out the bore on graph paper. This will allow you to write out the steps you need to make. Its fairly straightforward to measure the point accurately but use a micrometer NOT a digital caliper(They"re crap in engineering terms anyway). Then cover the lathe ways and file out the steps. An hour or two at the grinder and voila a nice shiny reamer.

Bob
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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  texasbagpiper on Tue Feb 08, 2011 12:46 pm

Bob Salter wrote:I use the method detailed by Bill Haneman in the link above. If you mean that you are setting over the cross slide at an angle then its more trouble than its worth. Setting it over accurately is a nightmare for a start. The cross slide has very limited travel so you would be constantly winding everything back and forward. In the case of an uileann reamer the taper isnt constant so having finally set the right angle for one part you would have to move it for the next. I think I would be running for the prozac by that point Very Happy If you do want a straight taper I would still use Bills' method. First draw out the bore on graph paper. This will allow you to write out the steps you need to make. Its fairly straightforward to measure the point accurately but use a micrometer NOT a digital caliper(They"re crap in engineering terms anyway). Then cover the lathe ways and file out the steps. An hour or two at the grinder and voila a nice shiny reamer.

Bob

So each step is filled away , with a hand file, while the blank is turning on the lathe? Also, whats wrong with a digital caliper, that's all I've ever used? Seth
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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Bob Salter on Tue Feb 08, 2011 2:44 pm

A digital caliper has a quoted accuracy of +-30 thou. Thats a lot if you are making a copy of an existing chanter. The one I use is actually pretty god but has "blind spots" for example in the 7 to 8mm range its useless. A micrometer is just as easy to use and for me has made a HUGE difference in the sound of the end result.I'll never go back. I actually managed to pick up a miyutoyo micrometer for twelve quid on ebay. Im making a set of Taylor reamers at the moment and am starting to really enjoy the process. I just need a good bass drone design now I'm unhappy with the Rowesome one it shouldn't be this hard to reed.


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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Jwalker on Tue Mar 08, 2011 10:45 pm

Okay, I just finished turning my first reamer. Did this on a 7x12 mini lathe ( harbor freight), that I custom extended. Thats an economic fix, you can usually pick one up brand new for about $350, if anyone wants to know how I did it let me know. So the reamer is for an uilleann chanter from the rowesome D set. It runs 13 7/16 OA from 9/16 to 15/64. Next thing I need to do is shave off half of one side. Any advise on how to meet up with the reed seat? The Plans don't mention this much, should I make a small tapered reamer for the seat itself? The way it says to drill through is 3/16 all the way then ream, so I guess these would meet up pretty close, but wouldn't there be a slight jump in ID?

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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  MichaelLoos on Wed Mar 09, 2011 11:44 pm

I'm not sure if I understand your question right - you make a pilot bore straight through the blank, then you ream the main bore from one side and the reed seat from the other (BTW, you do need a small reamer for the reed seat, the dimensions are also given in the Ginsberg plans), invariably these will meet and I can't see where and why there should be a bump.
15/64 is far too wide for the chanter throat, this is definitely a mistake in the Ginsberg plans. Most Rowsome Chanter throats are just under 7/32 (5.3 - 5.4 mm) which already is fairly wide compared to many other chanters. A chanter with a throat of 15/64 will most probably not work properly, in this part, 1/10 mm can the difference between instrument and firewood.
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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Jwalker on Thu Mar 10, 2011 1:16 am

Thanks, your dimensions seem more reasonable, I double checked the plans, and he does in fact call for 15/64. Does the end bore size of 9/16 seem correct? Thanks.

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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  texasbagpiper on Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:04 pm

Jwalker wrote:Thanks, your dimensions seem more reasonable, I double checked the plans, and he does in fact call for 15/64. Does the end bore size of 9/16 seem correct? Thanks.

The Rowsome design I use has a 3/16" throat and an end bore of approx 1/2", maybe a little under 1/2". Seth

P.S. Years ago I tried the Ginsberg plans and they didn't work for me. Use the free plans in the Sean Reid Volumes. I think their is a D in there but you might want to check. Seth
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Re: Fun with Reamers....

Post  Bob Salter on Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:47 pm

There is a narrow bore d but no standard bore d. There is the o'mealy chanter but I believe it plays flat of modern concert pitch. Best idea would be to get David Quinns excellent cd. Theres a couple of d chanters on there. Otherwise Chris Bayley has a excellent set of Rowesome plans. Those are what I use. You can contact either of them over at the uilleann forum.

Bob
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